My Reviews of English Graded Reader Series

We know that reading is essential for language students. First and foremost, reading helps students become better readers. As Frank Smith has said, “We learn to read by reading.” Reading also helps students increase their vocabulary, acquire grammar implicitly, and learn how to write. Plus, it’s enjoyable! Time and time again, research evidence has demonstrated the importance of reading. As Stephen Krashen wrote in The Power of Reading: “People acquiring a second language have the best chance for success through reading.”

Therefore, one of our main jobs as language teachers is to give our students access to books. In selecting books, there are basically only two criteria that need to be met:

  1. The books should be at an appropriate level for students. If the books are too difficult, students won’t learn much, and the reading process will feel painful and exhausting for them.
  2. The books should be interesting and enjoyable for the students to read. The more compelling, the better.

This idea is fairly simple, but putting it into practice can sometimes be difficult. For me, one of the main challenges is finding books. It can be hard to find books that meet both of those criteria. There are a lot of compelling books in existence—but most of them are way too difficult for my ESL students.

Luckily, us English teachers have it a little easier than teachers of other languages. English is such a popular language to learn worldwide that there are many books written for English language learners. These books are often called “graded readers” or sometimes “language-learner literature.” They are written in simplified language so they are easy for students to read. Most graded reader series have books written at various different levels, from the beginning to the advanced level.

The main ways I use graded readers in my classroom are:

  1. Whole-class novel reading—We choose a book and read it together as a class. All the students have a copy of the book, and I read it out loud while the students follow along in their own books. I usually do one chapter per class period. After reading a chapter, we usually discuss it together.
  2. Read-Alouds—I read a book aloud to the students while they listen. Again, we might discuss the book for a few minutes after each chapter.
  3. FVR (Free Voluntary Reading)—I have graded readers as a part of my FVR library, so students can browse through the books and choose ones that they want to read silently.

In this post, I will review the different series of graded readers that I’ve used in my classroom. These recommendations are based on my experience in teaching adult ESL. Therefore, most of these books are intended for adults. Although I have yet to encounter any overly explicit “adult” content in any of these books, you should always preview books before using with your students, particularly if you teach younger learners.

Due to the fact that I teach in the U.S., I always prefer using books written in American English over books written in British or other forms of English. This can actually be quite difficult to do, as it seems that the vast majority of graded readers are written in British English. Although American and British English are very similar, there are enough differences that it’s a little bit frustrating for me to use British English books in class. I feel like it’s kind of a waste of time to have to explain to students, I know that the book uses the word “trousers,” but we would never actually say that here. And some of my students like to listen to the audio versions of books, but the British English accent is much more difficult for them to understand and is not really ideal if they’re living in the U.S. and trying to learn American English. Of course, I do still occasionally use British English books since they are so prevalent. For books that I put in my FVR library, I usually go through the book and cross out any non-American English words and write in the American equivalent. And for read-alouds, it’s quite easy to simply replace words I need to without the students even knowing. In my reviews below, all of the book titles that I specifically mention are written in American English, unless otherwise noted.

These are the graded reader series that I’ve used:

 

Page Turners Reading Library, published by National Geographic/Cengage Learning

This is probably my favorite series overall. They have a mix of some American English and some British English books (though unfortunately, they do not label the type of English used in their books on their website, so it can be hard to know which are which.) Most of the stories are quite interesting and well-written. I also like that there are illustrations in the books, even the higher-level ones.

Some of my students’ favorite books in this series: The Man in the Sky (Level 8); The Long Road to Lucca (Level 9; in British English); Joe Faust (Level 9); Reunited (Level 10).

 

Cambridge English Readers, published by Cambridge University Press 

This is another one of my favorite series. Most of the books are written in British English, though there are a handful in American English. The stories are well-written and engaging to my students.

My students have enjoyed: Big Hair Day (Starter Level; in British English); Hotel Casanova (Level 1; in British English; this is one you should make sure to preview—there is a little bit of sexual content); No Place to Hide (Level 3); High Life, Low Life (Level 4); Emergency Murder (Level 5).

 

Pearson English Readers, published by Pearson

This series was formerly called “Penguin Readers” but is now published by Pearson and has been renamed as “Pearson English Readers.” They have a mix of original works and adaptations of classics. Most of their books are written in British English, but some are in American English.

I’ve successfully used the book Marley and Me (Level 2; see my detailed post about it here).

 

Hopes and Dreams Series, published by ProLingua Associates

In this series, each book tells the story of a different family of immigrants that settle in the United States. These books are not leveled, and their website says that the books are for “beginning readers,” but my guess is that they are referring to ABE or other native English-speaking students who have low literacy levels. For ESL students, I would say that these books are best for high-intermediate or advanced-level students. Though the books are pretty short, the language is somewhat advanced. Their website has a sample chapter from each book that you can use to preview it. My students seem to enjoy the stories pretty well, and they can often connect to the stories of immigrants.

 

Fluency Matters

The only graded reader that Fluency Matters has available in English is Felipe Alou, which I highly recommend. The book intentionally uses a lot of Spanish-English cognates, so for students who are native Spanish speakers, I think it could be used with high-beginning students or higher. For non-Spanish speakers, I would say it’s best for high-intermediate or advanced-level students. I wrote a more detailed blog post about this book here.

 

Fluency Fast

The only graded reader that Fluency Fast currently has available in English is an adaptation of Don Quixote. I offered it as an option during FVR time in my class of all Latino students, and several of them seemed eager to read it because they recognized the title. Most of them seemed to have a vague familiarity with the original book, so I think they liked the feeling of being able to read a famous work of literature (or at least an adaptation of it)! I’d say it works well for ESL students who are at a high-beginning level or above.

 

Compass Publishing

I haven’t used any of these books yet, but I did purchase the adaptation of A Christmas Carol (Level 3), and I’m planning to use it around Christmas time. Compass has a few different series: Compass Readers (a mix of original fiction and non-fiction books), Compass Classic Readers (adaptations of classic books), and Young Learners Classic Readers (classic stories for children—though many of them look like they would be perfectly fine to use with adults, too). Unfortunately, my experience with this company so far has been somewhat frustrating, as several of the books that I’ve attempted to order are out of stock (over a period of several months). Many of their books sound quite interesting, but I haven’t been able to get ahold of them yet.

 

These are all of the graded reader series that I’ve used, but there are many other series available. The Oxford Bookworms Library and MacMillan Readers are two other popular series; however, I have not used either of them.

One thing to keep in mind when evaluating books from different series is that each publishing company seems to have their own system for ranking the difficulty level of books. For example, a Level 4 book from Cambridge English Readers is roughly equivalent to a Level 7 book from Cengage Learning’s Page Turners Reading Library series. Fortunately, the Extensive Reading Foundation has a chart comparing the different levels of graded readers.

These book recommendations are based on my own experiences, and, of course, I can only tell you what has worked well for me in my classroom. Your students and your teaching context might be quite different from mine. But I hope that these reviews have at least helped to give you an idea of what kind of books are available for ESL students.

One thought on “My Reviews of English Graded Reader Series

  1. Pingback: How Do I Teach with Comprehensible Input? – Allison Lewis

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